Whose hands are your confidential email attachments in

Whose hands are your confidential email attachments in? According to the American Bar Association in 2012, 90% of IT respondents confirm they had a breach of data security. In the same study 71% of respondents said that their organization likely or very likely had experienced a theft or loss of email attachments. Those numbers would only be higher now that hackers are getting more and more sophisticated and prevalent. At your own firm how do you share confidential files with clients? By email? Thumb drive? On Dropbox, Drive or some other file sharing platform? None, according to experts can give you peace of mind. Even handing files off to clients face to face is safe. Why?             Because once your confidential documents, images and files are in anyone’s hands but yours you’ve lost control of them. They can be shared, duplicated, changed and even destroyed without your knowledge or consent. Example: Email attachments: The files you attach to an email are at risk during transmission but the risk doesn’t end when they land safely in the inbox of your client. Those files can now be downloaded, printed and shared. Your confidential documents can fall into the hands of people who are definitely on the “no fly” list when it comes to having access to your information. Drive, Dropbox, the personal hand-off of files and thumbdrives are no better. Once you share your files they are out of your control. You have no way to pull them back in or revoke access. Until now.                   Now there is a way to share your files and keep 100% control of them. You can...

Your data. Now appearing on your competitor’s bulletin..

Your data.  Now appearing on your competitor’s bulletin board or a public bus stop near you. Many companies aren’t clear on what data is confidential. Worse, many believe there is no sensitive information in their organization. In a lecture on ”Intellectual Property Protection” a participant suggested that his company’s data would be “Uninteresting for data thieves, including our design templates which, if received by competitors, would lead to only minor damage.” The lecturer replied: “If I understand you correctly, you’d be fine with your organization’s data publicly posted at any bus stop or bulletin board?” Three weeks later, the lecturer’s phone rang. The participant, after pondering the idea of their data being shared with the general public wanted to talk. They were now keenly aware that indeed, they did have data they did not want shared with anyone but authorized personnel. They, like many companies, have data including price calculations, board meetings, planned product innovations, offer documents, visit reports, contracts and identity documents that are currently unprotected. Imagining those documents freely shared with their competitors and the public prompted them to evaluate their document security and make changes rapidly. What data and documents do you have that you want to closely guard and control? What would you never want shared on a public bulletin...